Taking the Addiction Out of Smoking

A lightning bolt struck the tobacco world last Friday when the Food and Drug Administration announced a plan aimed at reducing the nicotine in cigarettes to a nonaddictive level. Within an hour, the value of global tobacco stocks plummeted — and for good reason.

The new F.D.A. chief, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, didn’t mince words in making the announcement. He noted that tobacco remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, resulting in nearly half a million annual fatalities. And he pointed out that the cigarette is the only consumer product that kills when used as directed — half of its long-term users, in fact — and that nicotine is the root cause of cigarette addiction.

Reducing nicotine in cigarettes so that they are “minimally or nonaddictive,” he asserted, “is a cornerstone of our new and more comprehensive approach to effective tobacco regulation.”

This is exceptionally good news for tobacco control, and for human health. A legal cap on the nicotine in cigarettes could be one of the most important interventions in human health history. The point is not that nicotine itself causes cancer (it’s the other chemical compounds in the smoke), but rather that by rewiring the brain, nicotine acts as the driver to keep smokers smoking. Nearly everyone who smokes long-term is addicted.

Cigarettes with nonaddictive nicotine levels would be radically different from what used to be known as “low tar” or “light” cigarettes, marketing gimmicks now barred by law. Those cigarettes were advertised as delivering less nicotine and tar into the lungs, even though there was no actual reduction.

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Regional Learning Collaboratives

Regional Learning Collaboratives

Ohio’s Regional Learning Collaboratives are designed to engage Ohio’s prevention professionals located within rural and Appalachian communities to offer guidance and support as they seek and obtain their Ohio Certified Prevention Specialist (OCPS) credentials. As a link within OCAM, coaches will assist with eliminating barriers, provide technical assistance and equip area professionals and community members with the necessary skills and knowledge to implement evidence-based prevention.

  • Assistance reaching your credentialing goals
  • Networking with other prevention professionals
  • Mobilizing community partnerships
  • Continuing education opportunities

Upcoming dates and locations:

September 18, 2017 10:00 am-2:30 pm
Ohio University Eastern Campus
45425 National Road, St. Clairsville, OH 43950

September 19, 2017 10:00 am-2:30 pm
Wood County Education Service Center
1867 Research Drive, Bowling Green, OH 43402

September 26, 2017 10:00 am-2:30 pm

Meridian Healthcare
527 North Meridian Road , Youngstown, OH 44509

To register any of these events go to:  www.pfs.ohio.gov/OCAM/SPF-PFS-OCAM-Trainings 

We will be having a working lunch.Lunch will be on your own. Laptops may be useful, but not required. CEUs pending.

For questions or more information contact Jennifer Benson at jenniferdbenson@gmail.com

OCAM was created to support the Ohio Strategic Prevention Framework Partnerships for Success State and Tribal Initiative (SPF-PFS) in the state of Ohio. Funding for the SPF-PFS is provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) and administered by OhioMHAS.

AP18 Registration Now Open

AP18 Registration Now OPEN!

Join colleagues and professionals from across  the globe at
AP18:  EVIDENCE TO ACTION Building an Evidence-Based Social Movement    

~ April 11-13, 2018 ~

Renaissance Arlington Capital view Hotel
Arlington, Virginia

REGISTER HERE FOR AP18

Of special interest to advocates: The convening of AP18 will include a first-ever ADVOCATE INSTITUTE, a pre-conference session. The institute will run all day Tuesday, April 10th and the morning of Wednesday, April 11th. If you are an advocate working with a nonprofit organization or public health department, please plan to join us!

To register for the Advocate Institute, please CLICK HERE. The Alcohol Policy Conference series convenes researchers, community practitioners, public officials, faith partners and other concerned citizens primarily from North America. Building on the foundation of the first conference in 1981, this event will continue to emphasize the importance of moving from evidence to action in alcohol policy research, development, implementation, enforcement and evaluation.

Slew of New Research Mounts on Failures of Marijuana Legalization: Pot Shops Linked to More Youth Use, More Crime, No Reductions in Drinking

Over the past several years, states that have legalized marijuana have suffered from a wide array of unintended consequences. States with legal marijuana continue to see a thriving black market, increases in youth drug use, a rise in fatal drugged driving crashes, and more.

As special interest groups march forward in their push to put profits ahead of health, the evidence regarding the harm caused by legalization continues to mount. Just this week, three new key pieces of information have emerged that should give politicians and regulators pause as they consider how to move forward. 

First, a key study published in the Journal of Primary Prevention examined the association between medical marijuana patients and licensed growers in Oregon.  According to the study, increases in youth marijuana use are associated with the proliferation of medical marijuana dispensaries in the state:

“Results of multi-level analyses indicated significant positive associations between rates of marijuana patients and growers per 1000 population and the prevalence of past 30-day marijuana use, controlling for youth demographic characteristics. The marijuana patient and grower rates were also inversely associated with parental disapproval of marijuana use, which decreased from 2006 to 2015 and acted as a mediator. These findings suggest that a greater number of registered marijuana patients and growers per 1000 population in Oregon counties was associated with a higher prevalence of marijuana use among youth from 2006 to 2015, and that this relationship was partially attributable to perceived norms favorable towards marijuana use.”

Second, in a sign that does not bode well for the marijuana industry, an NIH-funded study out of Denver found that legal pot shops are linked to higher rates of property crime in surrounding areas. The study found that the density of marijuana businesses was positively related to property crime in nearby areas, as well as marijuana-specific crime. According to the lead author of the study Bridget Freisthler:

“Over time, as marijuana grows in popularity, densities of marijuana outlets may increase, resulting in higher crime…There are definitely negative public health consequences [of legalization], including increased crime.”

Third, a new analysis out of Canada notes that marijuana legalization will have a negligible effect – if any – on alcohol consumption, despite promises made by advocates of marijuana legalization that users will switch.  According to the Globe and Mail, analysts project a less than 1 percent change in alcohol sales.  As we’ve warned for years, the story includes an admission by an industry analyst that the profitability of this addictive industry relies on hooking users early:

“Analyst Vivien Azer of U.S.-based research firm Cowen and Company is anticipating the alcohol industry could be under substantial pressure over the next decade if young people continue to take a pass on drinking.

In a report released last month, Azer said just under 82 per cent of 18- to 29-year-olds in Ontario consumed alcohol in 2015, down 5.5 percentage points since 2008, while marijuana use has been steady at around 34 to 36 per cent.

‘Our focus on these younger consumers reflects our belief that the experimenter of today is the leading consumer of tomorrow,’ said the report by Azer who also covers Canopy Growth.”

Every week, more evidence comes out pointing to the serious health and safety harms that come with legalizing marijuana. Local pot shops are spurring more crime, marijuana industry special interests are openly targeting adolescents, and youth marijuana use is rising in areas with medical marijuana businesses as more kids perceive pot as safe. It’s time for our elected officials to stop and ask if we’re moving in the right direction on marijuana. We can be ‘smart on crime’ by reforming our nation’s criminal justice system without commercializing a drug we know to be harmful.

  For more information, please visit www.learnaboutsam.org

Disordered Gambling Treatment Supervision Fellowship Program

Rec Res - logo

Recovery Resources has opened their application to apply for the Disordered Gambling Treatment Supervision Fellowship Program (Fellowship Program). The goal of this program is to prepare clinicians to provide clinical supervision for professionals who are eligible to treat people with disordered gambling. This includes skills such as the ability to provide clinical supervision in person and telephonically, to serve as a trainer on the topic of disordered gambling treatment and serve as a general resource regionally and at the state level on disordered gambling treatment.

The fellowship is comprised of training, clinical consultation, professional development planning and concludes with fellows presenting a case study and professional development plan. Specific program requirements and components are outlined on the application form.

Applications should be submitted by Friday, September 9th 2016 via:

  • Email: ahartman@recres.org
  • Fax: 216.431.4133
  • Mail: Recovery Resources, 3950 Chester Ave., Cleveland, OH 44114.

Late and/or incomplete applications will not be accepted.

The application can be downloaded at: Disordered Gambling Fellowship Application 2017 – Recovery Resources.

Latest OSAM Network Trend Report Available

OhioMHAS-Square_125pngThe Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring Network today released its most recent drug trend report Surveillance of Drug Abuse Trends in the State of Ohio: June 2015 – January 2016. The Network consists of eight regional epidemiologists, located in Akron-Canton, Athens, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and Youngstown, who conduct focus groups and individual qualitative interviews with active and recovering drug users and community professionals (treatment providers, law enforcement officials, etc.) to produce epidemiological descriptions of local substance abuse trends. Qualitative findings are supplemented with available statistical data such as coroner’s reports and crime laboratory data.

Proposed Rules Comment Period

The Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals Board is conducting its Five Year Rule Review.  This process allows the Board to review and evaluate each applicable rule for continued necessity of the rule and possible content modification. 

The Board is recommending changes to the following rules:

  • 4758-3-01: Fees This rule outlines fees for applying for a license, certificate or endorsement with the Board.  The Board is removing the written exam fee because the written exam is no longer available.  We are also changing the term RCH to CEU in all applicable rules and removing the laundry list of credential types for more universal terms where applicable. 
  • 4758-5-01: Requirements for Certification of CDCA This rule establishes application requirements for chemical dependency counselor assistants.  We are adjusting educational content areas in this rule to match those in the other chemical dependency counselor credentials for consistency and transferability.  We are also clarifying that this application requires approved education.  The prior term of “training” confused applicants and led them to believe they could use work experience for education. 
  • 4758-5-03: Requirements for Licensure of LCDC II This rule establishes application requirements for licensed chemical dependency counselor II.  We are adjusting language to allow for the use of online applications.  We are also identifying IC&RC domain areas by their number instead of title.  Lastly, we are cleaning up language for consistency across credentials.  
  • 4758-5-04: Requirements for Licensure of LCDC III This rule establishes application requirements for licensed chemical dependency counselor III.  We are adjusting language to allow for the use of online applications.  We are also identifying IC&RC domain areas by their number instead of title.  Lastly, we are cleaning up language for consistency across credentials.  
  • 4758-5-05: Requirements for Licensure of LICDC This rule establishes application requirements for licensed independent chemical dependency counselor.  We are adjusting language to allow for the use of online applications.  We are also identifying IC&RC domain areas by their number instead of title.  Lastly, we are cleaning up language for consistency across credentials.  
  • 4758-5-06: Requirements for Licensure of LICDC-CS This rule establishes application requirements for licensed independent chemical dependency counselor-clinical supervisor.  We are adjusting language to allow for the use of online applications.  We are also identifying IC&RC domain areas by their number instead of title.  Lastly, we are cleaning up language for consistency across credentials.  
  • 4758-6-01: Scope of Practice for CDCA This rule establishes the scope of practice for chemical dependency counselor assistant. We are removing a reference to OMHAS code as this code is being changed to refer licensees to their scope with the board.
  • 4758-6-04: Scope of Practice for LCDC III This rule establishes the scope of practice for licensed chemical dependency counselor III. We are removing a reference to OMHAS code as this code is being changed to refer licensees to their scope with the board.
  • 4758-6-05: Scope of Practice for LICDC This rule establishes the scope of practice for licensed independent chemical dependency counselor. We are removing a reference to OMHAS code as this code is being changed to refer licensees to their scope with the board.
  • 4758-10-01: Disciplinary Actions This rule establishes disciplinary guidelines for the board. We are removing a laundry list of credential types for more universal terms where applicable.  We are removing a reference to appealing in Franklin County as 119 allows appeals in the county where an individual lives or works.  We are increasing the time an individual must wait to reapply after receiving a revocation and removing the term “reinstatement” as revised code does not permit the board to issue reinstatements after a revocation. 
  • 4758-13-01: Continuing Education Requirements for Chemical Dependency Counselors This rule establishes continuing education requirements for chemical dependency counselors. We are removing a laundry list of credential types for more universal terms where applicable.  We are replacing the term “recognized clock hour” or “RCH” with “continuing education unit” or “CEU” to be consistent with field terminology.  We are removing the limit on hours that can be earned through in-service.  We are including language that identifies the Board’s authority to audit renewal hours. 
  • 4758-13-02: Continuing Education Requirements for Prevention Professionals This rule establishes continuing education requirements for prevention professionals. We are removing a laundry list of credential types for more universal terms where applicable.  We are replacing the term “recognized clock hour” or “RCH” with “continuing education unit” or “CEU” to be consistent with field terminology.  We are removing the limit on hours that can be earned through in-service.  We are including language that identifies the Board’s authority to audit renewal hours. 
  • 4758-13-03: Special Circumstances for Renewal This rule establishes special circumstances for renewal. We are removing a laundry list of credential types for more universal terms where applicable.  We are replacing the term “recognized clock hour” or “RCH” with “continuing education unit” or “CEU” to be consistent with field terminology.  We are adjusting language to allow individuals who have been on inactive status to use renewal hours completed any time during their inactive period.
  • 4758-13-04: Definitions of CEUs This rule defines continuing education. We are replacing the term “recognized clock hour” or “RCH” with “continuing education unit” or “CEU” to be consistent with field terminology.  We are adding the content areas for the gambling disorder endorsement.
  • 4758-13-07: Approval of CEUs This rule establishes approval processes for continuing education. We are replacing the term “recognized clock hour” or “RCH” with “continuing education unit” or “CEU” to be consistent with field terminology.  We are adjusting language to allow for the use of online applications.  We are adding approval processes for individual post approval of courses. 
  • 4758-15-01: Reciprocity This rule establishes IC&RC reciprocity requirements. We are updating the education and practical experience requirements to align with recent IC&RC requirement changes. 

For further information, please view the PROPOSED RULES along with the BUSINESS IMPACT ANALYSIS.

If you wish to comment on any of the proposed rules, please submit your comments by email to ferguson@ocdp.state.oh.us AND copy the Common Sense Initiative Office on your email at CSIPublicComments@governor.ohio.gov by July 1, 2015.