Studies offer conflicting views of alcohol, breast cancer risks

Is there a link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer? Data is still inconclusive, but most experts urge moderation.

We’ve all seen the memes: “It’s wine o’clock”; “Mommy needs wine”; “Just one glass [gallon-sized].”

And we’ve also seen the headlines: “Even low alcohol consumption linked to breast cancer,” “One drink a day increases breast cancer risk.”

Is there a link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer?

“There’s conflicting data on alcohol and implications with cancer. There are a lot of things that are being evaluated,” said Dr. Margaret MacDowell, medical director of Trident Cancer Center. “Right now they’re more potential contributing factors rather than a cause.”

Some breast cancer experts advise women to not drink at all to avoid any alcohol-related risk. Others maintain that an occasional drink is fine.

According to breastcancer.org, studies “consistently show that drinking beer, wine or liquor increases a woman’s risk of… breast cancer by raising levels of estrogen and other hormones associated with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer.”

This year, a report by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) and the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) says drinking just one glass of wine or other alcoholic drink a day increases breast cancer risk by 5 percent in pre-menopausal women and by 9 percent in post-menopausal women.

Compared to women who don’t drink at all, women who have three alcoholic drinks per week have a 15 percent higher risk of developing breast cancer.

Experts estimate that the risk of breast cancer goes up another 10 percent for each additional drink women regularly have each day.

Read more here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s